5 things every driver should know about cycling

If the way bicycle parts and kit keep selling out is anything to go by, the pandemic has turned everyone into a cyclist. Never one to miss a trend, this time last year I jumped onto my bike to give it a whirl and am now regularly cycling over 100k a week for fun. As a result, there are some observations I would really like to make about the relationship between motorised vehicles and people steaming along by pedal power…

1 Not all motorists. Not all cyclists.

Not all motorists drive like they’re actively trying to kill you. In fact, most of them drive really considerately, giving cyclists a wide berth and overtaking slowly. Sometimes people even shout encouragement when I’m cycling uphill. If this is you, I thank you. I always try to acknowledge when people have slowed down or made room for me – it’s just safer and more pleasant for everyone. It is also true that not all cyclists cycle sensibly, so please don’t judge us all by the exploits of the minority.

2 The edge of the road is where all the cr*p collects

I know that motorists are often annoyed when I don’t pull in closer to the kerb to enable them to overtake. It’s not because I’m deliberately being awkward, it’s because the edge of the road is the most hazardous part for a cyclist. It’s where the tarmac often disintegrates a bit, the drains are inset, and broken glass and other detritus accumulates. Basically everything likely to puncture a tyre or jettison me off the bike and under a car resides at the edge of the road. Also, on country lanes, the hedge that motorists blithely expect me to cycle up against is full of stinging nettles.

3 Being rude doesn’t enable me to go any faster

Shouting abuse out of the window as you overtake me because I have delayed your journey by 30 or 40 seconds does not magically return that time to you, nor does it enable me to cycle any faster. You’re just showing yourself up. To be fair, hardly anyone does this, but when they do, it really makes me wobbly.

4 Slow your speed or keep your distance

There’s a golden ratio between speed and distance, which means the faster you want to overtake, the wider the berth you need to give me. To the yellow van that accelerated past me this morning: you may very well think that 5 centimetres is a safe distance, but that’s because you are travelling in a metal box that has been specifically designed to protect you in the event of a high velocity impact. I am travelling in my cycling kit, which basically gives me the same degree of protection as my birthday suit, that is to say none at all.

5 Cyclists are not a slalom course

There is a certain kind of motorist (noone reading this blog, obviously) who treats cyclists like slaloms on a downhill ski run – they accelerate wildly to swerve round you then cut in front as aggressively as they can. The worst is when they do it 10 metres before braking hard to make a left turn, so you have to brake violently to avoid hitting them side-on. For some reason the slalom-swerve is also a favourite manoeuvre for people towing trailers, who seem entirely oblivious to the way the trailer is veering uncontrollably from side to side behind them, like an errant bowling ball randomly taking out any pins (cyclists) in its vicinity.

Despite these gripes, I have also had some lovely encounters – the man who stopped on a narrow lane to let me pass and said he was just happy to see someone out enjoying the sunshine; the lorry driver who overtook me three times because I kept catching him up in the traffic and tooted and waved when our routes finally diverged; and the many many people who have slowed down, made room or generally been considerate.

So my message to motorists is: there is room for all of us on the road and driving considerately will probably only take an extra 30 or 40 seconds (less time than it takes to park when you get wherever you’re going.) I wish you a safe and comfortable journey, please make the small adjustments that will allow me to have one too.

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